Total Eclipse of the Moon for the evening of September 27, 2015

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The total eclipse of the Moon on September 27 and 28th as seen from start to finish this September. Europe and the middle East will see totality as well. East Asia, Australia and most of the Pacific will be in daylight. The animation is set at a rate of one frame per minute.

Please make plans next month to see this total eclipse of the Moon. The 27th falls on a Sunday evening, so this will be a great outdoor activity with the family. The best part of this celestial show is that it's free, and you don't need a telescope!

The next total eclipse of the Moon will be on the morning of January 31, 2018 which will be centered over the Pacific Ocean; thus, the western half of the US (more or less) will see totality with only a partial east of the Mississippi River.

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This is how the total lunar eclipse will appear for the eastern part of North America. The western half will see totality, but not all of the stages (partial, penumbra) from start to finish. (Starry background created in Starry Night Pro) The animation is set at a rate of one frame per minute.




The above graphic is set for central daylight savings time. You can also download these following time zones as well: ADT, EDT, CDT, MDT, PDT, AKDT, HAST, and CEST_Europe. I would like to thank Petr Horálek, who lives in the Czech Republic, for catching a time mistake which I now have corrected on all graphics for this lunar eclipse!

El gráfico anterior se establece para el este de horario de verano. También puede descargar estos siguientes zonas horarias , así : ADT, EDT, CDT, MDT, PDT, AKDT, HAST

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A view from the southern hemisphere.

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This is how the Earth and Moon look from space during a total eclipse of the Moon on September 27-28th. As you can see, the Pacific and parts of the Indian Ocean are facing daylight - away from the lunar eclipse. The inner ring marks the location of the umbra and the outer ring is the penumbra. (I used Starry Night Pro to create this particular graphic with a few modifications in Adobe Flash.)

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If you were on the Moon facing the Sun on September 27th, the Earth will block out most of the sunlight creating a total eclipse of the Sun. With the Sun behind the Earth, Earth's atmosphere will filter out most of the colors except red. Acting somewhat like a lens, our atmosphere will refract all the sunsets and sunrises simultaneously towards the Moon and redden the lunar landscape. Once in a great while, however, lunar eclipses can become pitch black!

 

Our Super/Harvest Moon, for September 27th, two hours after sunset as seen from Nashville and then Los Angeles. For Nashville, the Moon will be partially eclipsed - some thirty minutes before totality. Los Angeles will also see a partially eclipsed Moon two hours after sunset, but the Moon will be exiting the Earth's shadow (after totality). This is because we are viewing this from two different vantage points on the surface of a global Earth.

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The software for this image is free and can be found at http://www.stellarium.org/. It's also great to use if you want to know what the Moon looks like three days or three years from now. It's very easy to use! (My fireflies are rugged in all weather conditions!)
A very nice manual simplified down to 18 pages with lots of pictures in how to use Stellarium!

What time is sunrise or sunset for you? Check this website out (time and date.com).

email me!

Updated on September 28, 2015